Azulejos in Porto

After many months of a more mundane life, Las Chicas return to adventuring.

Following a short time in Barcelona visiting with friends, we head to Porto, Portugal. We are drawn to Porto to see the azulejos, a form of painted, tin-glazed tiles common to Portuguese architecture.  They surround us everywhere.

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The word azulejo comes from the Arabic word zellige, meaning “polished stone.”  These tiles were modeled to  imitate the Roman mosaics.

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We visit some of the grand examples of the tiles.
First, São Bento Train Station. Constructed in the early 1900s, it still serves as a bustling station today. The walls are adorned with 20,000 azulejos picturing historic scenes from Portugal’s past. Some original, some restored, all magnificent.

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Next we venture on to Igreja do Carmo, the 18th century church covered in azulejos. In 1912,  Silvestro Silvestri designed the side image (pictured below) that commemorates the founding of the Carmelite order of  nuns.

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Igreja do Carmo is attached to the Igreja das Carmelitas ,

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by a meter-wide building that housed monks until the 1980s.

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Entryway of MMIPO – Museu da Misericordia do Porto:

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And we even enjoy the azulejos over  a traditional Portugese lunch of bacalao and vinho verde.

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